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  issue 1, year XIV, 2007


Dr. KAROLOS PAPOULIAS,
President of the Hellenic Republic:
EU is obliged to the Balkans, not Balkans to Europa
page 4

H. E. Mrs DANAI MAGDALINI KOUMANAKOU,
Ambassador of the Hellenic Republic
Interview by Tsvetanka Elenkova
page 6

GREECE 2004-2006: FROM REFORMS TO RESULTS
Speech of the Minister of Economy and Finance of the Hellenic Republic mr. George Alogoskoufis at the “8-th invest in Greece” forum in New York, 11/17/1006
page 8

The Greek economy has been transformed into a more open and definitely more competitive environment. An environment friendlier to investment and entrepreneurship. As a result, there has been the significant increase of forein investment in Greece over the last year. The attractiveness of our country for increased foreign investment is neither random nor coincidental. It’s the result of a carefully designed reform agenda with specific targets, with specific objectives aimed to influence and -where necessary- change radically the economic environment of our country.

BRISK EXTROVERTED GROWTH AND GEOGRAPHY MAKE GREECE A CONTEMPORARY GATEWAY TO SOUTH-EASTERN EUROPE
Speech by mr. Panos Leivadas,
secretary general of information,
Minietry of state 8-th annual capital link forum, New York city, 11/17/2006
page 10

Contemporary Greece serves as the gateway towards all of South-Eastern Europe. Therefore, one can no more understand the vigor and the potential of the Greek economy simply in terms of its 10 million citizens; instead, one must look at as being inseparable from the broader region’s economies.

PROF. GEORGIOS TSIOTRAS,
Secretary General of the Region of Central Macedonia, Greece:
WE IMPLEMENTED THE DEVELOPMENT ACT WITH ABSOLUTE SUCCESS
Intervie by “Europe 2001” magazine
page 12

GREEK BUSINESS IN BULGARIA
by dr. Dimitrios Zomas,
First concellor economic & commercial affairs
page 14

The penetration of Greek companies in Bulgaria began in the early years of the transition period, its development following the various stages of development of Bulgarian economy. In the early phases of the transition from communist to liberal market system, Greek investments were limited both in volume, and in subject of activity. In the years that followed, they grew, following the conditions and opportunities of the local economy. The modern history of Bulgarian economy can be divided into periods on the basis of some borderline events that mark the turns along the road to drawing closer to the West European economic model and the final goal - Bulgaria’s accession to the European Union.

THE NEW CONNECTION: THE EUROPEAN REALITY IN THE BILATERAL RELATIONS
by Nikos Vlahakis,
Press Counsellor at the Embassy of the Republic of Greece in the Republic of Bulgaria
page 16

The accession of Bulgaria and Rumania into the European family adds to the historic EU’s Fifth expansion, thus giving a clear Balkan dimension to the plan for European integration. The three South European countries will be able to participate and enjoy the fruits of this generous project, which reflects what the German philosopher Emanuel Kant had called at his time “European perennial peace”- maybe for the first time in their common history. A new page has been opened in the relations between Bulgaria and Greece - not simply of “good neighbourhood and good cooperation”, but of “partnership”, which will add a new quality to them. As the Greek Prime Minister Mr. Konstantinos Karamanlis pointed out in his message to the Bulgarian people through the “Trud” daily: “Bulgaria’s acceptance into the European Union reflects the impressive progress, which your country has achieved in the last years in all basic fields of human activities with regards to political stability and economic and social development.”

RAKOVSKY AND RIGAS IN THE BALKAN CULTURAL-HISTORIC PATTERNS
by Prof. dr. Kiril Topalov
page 17

In the epoch of revival and building of independent national cultures and states revolutionaries, such as Rakovsky and Rigas Velestinlis, came to the fore. The time of Rakovsky was identical to the greatest extent to that of Rigas Velestinlis. That is why both figures, at an interval of half a century, manifested themselves as one-type function of one and the same cultural-historic model, typical for the development of the enslaved Balkan peoples in the 18th and 19th c. Both men took part in extremely dynamic political and intellectual activities, which decisively changed and predestined all their lives.

THAKIS THEODOROPOULOS: WITH PANTING BREATH
(essay)
page 19

The author discovers the antibodies of European civilization in the heritage of Oedipus Rex. Without Thucydides, Cervantes might have never written his “Don Quixote”. Without Herodotus, Kafka would have looked as hanging in the air. The breath of Athens, regulated by Rome, gives the rhythm of European sensibility. It programmes the great course of artistic and author’s creativity. And when Athens and Rome both have panting breath, Europe loses its tempo, stumbles, and sways on the edge of depression and boredom.

MODERN TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURES IN ATTIKA
page 23

Not so far ago the endless traffic jams embittered the everyday life of millions of inhabitants in Attika. Following a number of large-scale building projects, this chronic disease has finally been overcome by way of the construction of: the circular motorway “Attika”, the modernization of the Kakya Skala section of the Athens - Corynth thoroughfare, the Rio-Andirio suspension bridge, which connects Western continental Greece with Pelopones, the new expansions of Athens metro, the new tram lines and the Athens “Eleftheros Venizelos” Airport.

PROGRAMMES FOR TRANSBOUNDARY COOPERATION BETWEEN GREECE AND BULGARIA - OPPORTUNITIES FOR DEVELOPMENT THROUGH COMMON PROJECTS FOR ALTERNATIVE TOURISM
Dr. Maria Vaxevanidou,
First Secretary of Communications at the Embassy of the Republic of Greece in the Republic of Bulgaria
page 25

Greece and Bulgaria are members of the European family and can do much through their common European orientation. Both countries have already amassed experience from their bilateral cooperation in realizing common transboundary programmes. These programmes include quite a few areas, among them being programmes referring to the development of transboundary cooperation in the field of culture, tourism, human resources, environment protection and sustainable growth. There is also a programme related to stable development through protection and conservation of waters and biodiversity.
The paths of wine in Northern Greece are seven altogether and are combined with visits to a number of archeological landmarks and sanctuaries, and sites of extraordinary natural beauty.

SPLENDID EVROS DELTA
page 28

At the Northeastern edge of Greece, on the border with Turkey, the river Evros forms a rich and remarkable delta of international importance, covering a total area of 200 km2. The delta’s biotops are unique, with rare features shaped by its advantageous geographical location at the crossroad of three continents. Evros Delta is characterized by a large degree of diversity in its vegetation. More than three hundred and fifty species of plants have been found in the protected area. Forty six species of fish, forty species of animals, twenty eight species of amphibians and reptiles live in the wetland. The value of the wetland is very significant for the migration and wintering of many bird species.

“A. G. LEVENTIS” FOUNDATION:
SCOPE FOR CHARITY
page 30

CHANIA - CRETE’S SPIRITUAL CAPITAL
by Zdravka Mihailova
page 32

Chania (Hania) is the spiritual capital of Crete, despite the fact that administratively that title was given to Iraklio in 1971. It is also the most attractive town on the island.
Strolling along its ancient streets, you cannot help stepping on ruins of the town fortress wall, on remnants of ancient Cydonia, as well as on pieces of Venetian and Turkish masonry. Chania’s cross-road situation explains why for many centuries on end, up to the present day, different cultures and traditions have co-existed in its old quarters. In 1964 Greece proclaimed Chania a town with a statute of an architectural monument.

DRAMA: ALONG THE PATHS OF NATURE AND HISTORY
page 35

The town of Drama is a cosmopolitan capital, an administrative, economic and cultural centre of one of the least known prefectures in Greece. It resembles a kaleidoscope of Nature’s infinite diversity. The town of Drama and its surroundings connect geographically, historically, ecologically and economically the hot beaches of the Aegean Sea with the Balkan hinterland, the good-natured magic of the South with the irresistible charm of the North.

KAVALA: THE NEW OLD NEAPOLIS
page 37

Nowadays, Kavala’s economic life is sustained by commerce, tourism, fishing and processing industry. The stroll around Kavala includes, by all means, the old town of Panagia, perched on the hilly coast opposite the harbour. The “Karaolis” square can serve as a starting point. There is a Turkish fortress on top of the hill. Erected in 1425 at the site of the ancient Acropolis, the fortress offers a panoramic view towards Panagia and the aqueduct, which divides the old section of the town from the modern one.

KSANTI: DIONYSSEUS’ SPECTACLES DURING SHROVETIDE
page 39

Ksanti (Xanthi) impresses the visitor with its beautiful old quarter. The monasteries “Panagia Archangeliotissa”, “Panagia Kalamiotissa” and “Pamegisti taxiarches” are sheltered in its outskirts. West of Ksanti, the 20 km gorge of the Nestos/Mesta river meanders in picturesque serpentines, for which it has been proclaimed a site of extraordinary natural beauty. On the very day of Shrovetide, great animation pervades Ksanti. The fifteen days long Ksanti carnival is an heir to the “Thracian Quadragesimal holidays”, initiated in 1966. The culmination of the revelry is marked by a great procession.

MODERN GREEK ACHITECTURE
by Prof. Dimitris Filipidis
page 42

THE IMAGE OF MODERN GREEK CINEMA
by Yorgos Papalios
page 45

Modern Greek cinema presents personal and burning stories, ancient mythology, but also the historic reality of the 20th c., public and cultural peculiarities, emigration, but also the Europeization of Greek society. These are some of the main directions, which provide themes to a cinema, reaching so far as to be aesthetically optimistic, politically informed and communally sensitive. Greek culture was, and still is in many respects, an extrovert culture, while Greek cinema was, and still is, a great messenger of modern Greek civilization.

FROM THE ANCIENT LYRE THROUGH REBEC TO BOUZOUKI
by Zdravka Mihailova
page 47

Traditional musical instruments, which are perceived today as works of art, and which have often been produced by the musicians, who have themselves played on them, present an important historical key. The decorative details, their potentialities and the way, in which instruments are combined, all show the artistic sensitivity and the musical perceptions of the society which had created and used them. Greece has preserved a rich folk tradition, whose roots pass through Byzantium, Ottoman yoke, Venetian domination, go way back to antiquity, and are linked with all Mediterranean peoples. The visitor of Athens can see this precious heritage at the Museum of traditional Greek musical instruments.

WHO WAS NIKOS KAZANTZAKIS (1883-1957)
by Geoges Stassinakis,
International union of friends of Nikos Kazantzakis
page 49

Kazantzakis is a world-known writer, poet, thinker. In the current year we mark the 50th anniversary of his death. We know him through the cinematographic adaptation of his novel “The Life and Adventures of Alexis Zorbas”, as well as through his voluminous creative work, which is diverse and complex. Nikos Kazantzakis has embraced all literary genres: poetry, theatre, novel, essay, travel notes, children’s books, translations, correspondence, scripts. His philosophy is linked to life and is most actual to this day.

NEO-GREEK AT BULGARIAN UNIVERSITIES
by Prof. Stoyna Poromanska
page 50

Language is the most direct way of communication. Young people have turned to learning of foreign languages - a phenomenon, which the renowned Greek linguist Georgios Babiniotis aptly characterized as “a boom”. The learning of the Neo-Greek language in Bulgaria is deeply rooted. Old Neo-Greek textbooks, as well as Greek-Bulgarian dictionaries of 1879 - only a year after Bulgaria’s liberation, can be found at the National Library “St.St. Cyril and Methodius” in Sofia. This interest in Neo-Greek has been ever more expressed in the last years. Neo-Greek turns into means of social realization. The mixed Greek-Bulgarian companies need highly qualified personnel. The number of people willing to learn Neo-Greek language and literature in the specialty of Neo-Greek Philology is impressively high.

TRANSLATIONS FROM GREEK INTO BULGARIAN IN THE LAST HUNDRED YEARS
by Prof. Stoyna Poromanska
page 52

The centuries-old interest of the two neighbouring peoples in each other is quite natural. The translated Greek text appears for the first time in Bulgaria through the convertion to Christianity and the translation of Christian books. During the Renaissance the translations of literary works become ever more numerous. The first translations of neo-Greek authors come into being, and keep coming out, so far as to get to the impressive presence of Nikos Kazantzakis through the superb translations by the unforgettable Georgi Koufov. The considerable number of translated Greek authors led us to the conclusion for the necessity of compiling a catalogue of translated titles from Greek into Bulgarian.

EUROPEANS
Famous Greeks:
El Greco,
Konstantinos Kavafis,
Georgios Seferis,
Odyseas Elytis,
Maria Callas,
Mikis Theodorakis,
Vangelis,
Konstantinos Karamanlis,
Manos Hadjidakis
page 53

PHOTOATELIER PRESENTS:
ANTOAN BOJINOV
page 57

LITART PRESENTS:
DIMITRIS ALOS
page 62
MARKOS MESKOS
page 63

ATELIER PRESENTS:

VESSELIN DAMYANOV:
COLOUR IS CULTURE
by Dochka Kisiova-Gogova
page 66
BOGOMIL ARSOV:
SUN, IRRESISTIBLE YOUTH AND VITALITY
by Krasimira Aleksieva
page 68
Translated by Galia B. Cholakova
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